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March 5 1934-2019

Sixty-five years. And mom is only 39.

momndad

New York Daily News, February 7th, 2019

FULL TEXT:

L train riders and transit workers continued to be canaries in the MTA’s coal mine Wednesday.

Three MTA workers had to be hospitalized after hours spent inhaling the same sickening stench that caused a brief shutdown the day before.

The workers fell ill from the heavy fumes — and later on, Transport Workers Union Local 100 officials began distributing masks to station agents.

“They’re telling them the smell is still here. Some guys are saying, I’m starting to feel a little lightheaded,” a subway source said. “Another person is saying, ‘It’s making me nauseous.’”

State Department of Environmental Conservation officials Wednesday found water with “sheens” that seeped into the subway, giving off a smell an agency spokeswoman called “aged petroleum odors.” MTA officials believe it’s heating oil.

The gas smell seemed to hit riders the hardest between the Graham Ave. and Grand St. stops, lingering through to the Bedford Ave. station.

Despite the all-clear to start service back up Tuesday, riders and transit workers were still being affected by the stink overnight and through Wednesday.

“It’s scary,” said Joe Vincent, 55, a bartender from Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “Gas like this, you don’t know what it’s going to do to you.”

Gillian Lavictoire, 33, who was with her 5-year-old daughter at the Graham Ave. station, said it was an awful smell, though it’s dissipated over the previous couple of days.

“If it’s a health and safety matter, they should shut it down,” she said.

Ralph Russo, who lives across the street from the Graham Ave. station entrance, said he was unable to sleep in his street-facing bedroom. He thought the gasoline-like smell was unsafe.

“I had to lock the doors and sleep in the living room,” Russo, 77, said. “It was terrible. I couldn’t deal with the smell.”

One TWU station agent working at Graham Ave. bought his own mask after he began to feel ill on duty, a Local 100 source said.

A train conductor was also witnessed wearing a paper mask while on duty.

“It’s terrible,” he said.” I got a headache.”

~ B ~

Please be green, only print this e-mail if absolutely necessary

“You cannot play God then wash your hands of the things that you’ve created. Sooner or later, the day comes when you can’t hide from the things that you’ve done anymore.”

This is something to talk about, not hide away or make people ashamed of. Be there for the ones you love.

Happily Ever After*

Hi. I’m Danni and I have Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. I’m presently  untreated, and unmedicated.

I’m pretty high-functioning, though, so most people don’t realize how hard I’m working to keep my eyes open because my depressed brain wants to sleep for 14 hours a day and my anxiety maybe lets me get 5. Or that I’m keeping my limbs tucked in tight partly to be polite and take up less space because I’m paranoid about my size, but mostly because even on a rush hour train I’m afraid an accidental touch from a stranger is going to trigger a bout with the screaming meemees.

I present as perfectly calm, put together, and slightly detached, even aloof sometimes.

Meanwhile the inside of my head looks a bit more like this with a soundtrack of Dani Filth-like shrieks overlaid:

20190119_105632 Storage, after approximately 21 hours of clean up (non-consecutive)

Last year was…

View original post 560 more words

Brock Turner is trash

This dude is appealing his conviction. Not his sentence cause he got 6 months if which he only served 3 months. No he wants his conviction overturned because he didn’t want to rape her just ‘dry-hump’ her. Ok you entitle white asshole, you deserve to die in a fire.

It wasn’t consensual so it is still sexual assault! You ruined your life, despite what your asshole father said, this is all on you, not the victim.

As I was reading my work e-mails, basically just news articles about the environment, I decided to post one of the articles here. As I was doing so I realized that for a long time, I have not been doing much with this blog. Considering I pay for this site, I really should fix that. Most of my posts lately have been reposting of articles and short snippets.

The first thing I did was update my blog roll. I updated the links because I changed some of my urls. I still ‘own’ them, but they are inactive. Now you can click the link and go to my other blogs. On this site at least, I need to fix my other blogs. Also, if you have been reading maybe you read my rant about Photobucket wanting to charge me $400 to use my own photos. So I have to fix those photos. I think this blog is done. I also fixed the links to, or I should say, removed the links that are no longer valid on my list of “Interesting People”. Some blogs were gone, some had not been posted to in years etc. Along the way I was re-acquainted with some bloggers that I had forgotten about. There was a reason I linked to their blogs. Good reading.

Finally, I put down the beer, made some coffee and put some gluten-free mac-n-cheese in the oven. That is another thing I am trying to do and something else to write about. Trying to stick to my diet, generally eat healthier and not drink so much. Although I do need to work on Phil’s hat, but it is getting a little late. I think my dinner is about done. Hope to be back soon!

Queens Chronicle, May 28th, 2018

FULL TEXT:

The Environmental Protection Agency has offered some details on the pending cleanup of the former Wolff-Alport Chemical Co. lot in Ridgewood — a federal Superfund site.

Two weeks after the Chronicle reported that it was unclear when remediation work would commence at the contaminated Irving Avenue property, EPA Public Affairs Region 2 Director Mary Mears told the paper that the $40 million project is in the design phase.

“We are currently doing the engineering work needed to do the cleanup,” Mears said. “Detailed cleanup plans are developed during the remedial design. Remedial design includes development of engineering drawings and specifications for a site cleanup.”

Wolff-Alport occupied the plot of land in question from 1920 until 1954 and processed imported monazite sand.

Monazite contains up to 8 percent thorium, a radioactive element that the company sold to the federal government for use in the Manhattan Project, the top-secret program to develop the atomic bombs that were dropped on Japan to end World War II.

But the company regularly dumped thorium waste into the sewer system and on its property until 1947.

The EPA began investigating the location — which a deli, auto body shops, a construction company and a warehouse now call home — in 2012 when radon gas leaks were discovered there, officially declaring it a Superfund site a year later.

Last fall, the EPA ordered the permanent relocation of the businesses from the premises, leading up to the demolition of the former factory buildings they reside in.

The contaminated soil underneath them will also be excavated and removed, while sewer infrastructure at the site will be replaced.

Mears confirmed that because of earlier EPA short-term remediation, there is no immediate threat to nearby residents, employees or customers of the businesses. But the site still requires a cleanup, something she said the agency is deep into planning.

Over the last few months, Mears noted, the EPA has been finalizing demolition plans, designing the debris disposal process, hired a relocation specialist from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and created cost estimates for the businesses’ relocation.

Those aspects of the plan will be completed by October. But when the cleanup can begin, however, is “dependent on funding availability.”

“After the remedial design phase, EPA’s cleanup can begin, pending the availability of funds,” Mears said.

In cases where no existing company can be held financially responsible for a cleanup, the federal government has to pick up most of the tab, along with the state.

But from 1980 to its expiration in 1995, a tax on the chemical and petroleum industries helped generate more than $4 billion specifically used for Superfund cleanup

Earlier this month, Rep. Nydia Velazquez (D-Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens) introduced legislation to reinstitute that fee, citing the sizable cost of remediation efforts such as Wolff-Alport, as well as President Trump’s proposed slashing of the EPA’s Superfund cleanup budget by 30 percent.

Mears said the agency does not comment on proposed legislation, but it was working closely with Velazquez’s office on the agency’s efforts in Ridgewood.

In a Nov. 27, 2017 letter to Velazquez, EPA Regional Administrator Peter Lopez said the agency is hard at work trying to help the businesses that are being relocated.

The EPA, he said, has set aside $1.12 million for those entrepreneurs, while also tasking the Army Corps of Engineers to help them search for comparable properties.

“In addition to complete coverage of their moving expenses, the business tenants may be eligible for reestablishment expenses up to $25,000 for expenses actually incurred in relocating and reestablishing the enterprise at a replacement site,” the letter reads.

Business owners can use that payment, Lopez said, to help pay for repairs, new signage and advertising, as well as the cost of rent and utilities for up to 42 months.

They will also be able to return to the Wolff-Alport site once it has been remediated. But the entrepreneurs would have to be the ones to rebuild there, not the EPA.

“Please note that it will be quite a number of years before the remediation is completed and any redevelopment takes place,” his letter warns.

 

Staten Island Advance, October 4th, 2017

FULL TEXT:

CITY HALL — State and federal authorities supported killing Staten Island deer in order to control the borough herd, officials confirmed.

The feds even undertook an environmental assessment of such a deer "cull" in 2015, but the NYPD "blanched" and the city refused, Borough President James Oddo wrote on Facebook Tuesday.

The Parks Department confirmed Oddo’s account, but said the NYPD didn’t "blanch." A cull was considered unrealistic because Staten Island is still an urban environment and even a controlled slaughter would require large swaths of borough green space to be cordoned off by the NYPD.

Police supervising the hunt would only add to the cost and complexity of the endeavor. Hunting is illegal across the five boroughs, so the city would have to get special state approvals for the kind of massive deer cull demanded by Staten Island’s large herd. And because hunting is illegal, any city slaughter would likely be delayed by potential lawsuits.

Ultimately the city decided to sterilize hundreds of Staten Island bucks. More than 875 vasectomies have been performed on them since the program began last year.

Oddo wrote about officials discussing the deer cull in a Facebook post that linked to an Advance story about an injured deer barging into a clothing shop on New Dorp Lane Monday afternoon. The deer was euthanized.

The borough president said that situations like this "might become more prevalent" during the mating season.

The number of collisions with vehicles tends to increase during the mating season or "rut" for white-tailed deer because bucks and doe are less cautious and are primarily focused on mating. The rut in New York is typically between October and January.

"I have long warned that one day we will see the tragic loss of human life occur," Oddo wrote on Facebook. "It has not yet happened, but it feels inevitable."

Oddo wrote he’s "tried to raise the alarm with literally every level of government."

"We even got the federal, state, and city officials together to discuss a solution that could have included a cull of the population, and the federal government undertook an environmental assessment throughout 2015," Oddo wrote. "In fact, the USDA and State DEC were ready and willing to undertake a cull, similar to what has been done in other jurisdictions similar to Staten Island. This was stopped because the NYPD blanched, the City of New York refused, and activists were waiting on standby to bring lawsuits that some believe would have delayed any action for many years."

Oddo’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request for additional comment. The NYPD, U.S. Department of Agriculture and state Department of Environmental Conservation didn’t immediately comment.

"Under the current integrated deer management plan, the City has been able to act as rapidly and humanely as possible to limit the future impacts of deer on Staten Island," Parks Department spokesman Sam Biederman said. "We have sterilized an estimated 90% of the male deer on Staten Island, enhanced driver safety measures and educational efforts, and taken aggressive action to protect Staten Island’s natural resources. And as Borough President Oddo says, awareness is key: Drivers in Staten Island must stay vigilant for deer during rutting season."

VASECTOMY EFFORT CONTINUES

An unrestrained deer herd can harm parks and private property, spread tick-borne illness like Lyme disease and wander into roads more often, increasing the risk for deadly vehicle collisions.

Manipulating deer fertility is only permitted by the state as part of scientific research. The state Department of Environmental Conservation, which regulates wildlife, approved the city’s vasectomy program last year.

Parks Department contractor White Buffalo will be paid up to $3.3 million by the city to perform vasectomies over the course of a three-year research program. The second year will be divided into two phases — from Aug. 15 and Oct. 20 and then in winter 2018.

The vasectomy effort is expected to eventually reduce the herd 10 to 30 percent annually, though some wildlife experts thought the plan won’t work because the city is ignoring basic deer biology and conventional herd management practices.

The Parks Department believes the herd is now growing mostly through reproduction, not migration, and sterilizing males instead of females is meant to be faster, cheaper and more humane.

There are between 1,918 and 2,188 deer across Staten Island, according to a estimate from White Buffalo using data from the vasectomy program.

That’s about four times the city’s last count and a 9,000 percent increase in the herd since 2008.

CITY REVIEWED MULTIPLE CONTROL METHODS

Before deciding on sterilization, city officials reviewed a variety of methods that could be used to manage New York state deer. They were outlined in a federal draft assessment prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and Wildlife Services and released in November 2015.

Lethal solutions included shooting, hunting and euthanizing deer. Non-lethal methods included physically barricading or fencing deer, altering habitats, supplemental feeding to reduce crop damage, relocation, behavior modification with noise or visual stimuli, chemical pesticides or birth control.

De Blasio wouldn’t rule out killing the deer in March 2016, telling the Advance, "I don’t want to presume how we handle it yet until we finish the work of assessing the situation." That was two months before the city unveiled the sterilization plan.

Oddo has previously said lethal methods should be used to control Staten Island deer.

"Any deer management plan that does not take an integrated approach that includes lethal and non-lethal means is tantamount to kicking the can down the road and putting off the tough decisions. It is deciding by not deciding," Oddo said in a statement in March 2016. "Staten Island and Staten Islanders will pay a heavy price for that delay."

Oddo wrote Tuesday, "It seems no one is happy with the current deer situation."

"On the one hand, some want us to do nothing and leave them alone. Those folks cringe when they see bucks that have been tagged as part of the current male sterilization plan," Oddo wrote. "On the other end of the spectrum are those who want more aggressive action by government. Even those who favor the current male sterilization don’t really know what its impact will be."

Posted with comment: So you would rather have your daughter traumatized, also shouldn’t feed birds breed dumbass.

CBS TV, September 13th, 2017

FULL TEXT:

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There’s a new plan to reduce the mute swan population on Long Island.

Some say the non-lethal plan is a kinder solution, while others continue to mount a strong public opposition.

The quacking of ducks and swans in the ponds of Massapequa Preserve helps draw thousands of people daily, yet the state Department of Environmental Conservation considers the growing population of mute swans to be a destructive, invasive species imported centuries ago from Europe.

For years, the agency has proposed killing them off, arguing they eat up all the vegetation needed by other native species.

Without exception, though, everyone CBS2 spoke with was horrified at doing anything to harm the mute swans.

“I think they’re beautiful,” Massapequa resident Jean Stigliano said. “I think we should leave them alone, if there is any kind of problem then we should relocate them.”

The intense public opposition now has the state agency reversing course, saying it will instead pursue “non-lethal means,” such as coating swan eggs with corn oil so they don’t hatch, or destroying their nests.

Some locals say that’s equally cruel.

“The poor swans are still there, sitting on their eggs every day and then one day they’re all dead! How horrible, how horrible, you can’t do that,” Massapequa resident Joan Locascio said.

The state environmental department says it must also protect public safety, warning the elegant birds can become aggressive toward anyone feeding them.

That’s exactly what happened to Sean Hogan’s younger daughter.

“My daughter was feeding the swan, it came up and she had a little too much bread and it took a bite and grabbed her by her finger,” Hogan tells CBS2.

He says his daughter was not seriously harmed, arguing the same thing could happen with a family pet, and adds his family will keep feeding the swans and will oppose any attempt to remove them no matter which means are pursued.

The public will get a chance to have their say about the mute swans. A hearing on the agency’s latest plan is set for next Tuesday night in Hauppauge.

Just viewed my blog online. Instead of my pictures there is a notification “Please update your account to enable 3rd party hosting”. Oh all right says I, so I type the link into my browser and go to Photobucket – $399. Yes, $400 to use my photos on my blog. What the actual fuck? When I can just download my pictures and post them on my blog. I really don’t think so.