Category: Environment


Posted with comment: So you would rather have your daughter traumatized, also shouldn’t feed birds breed dumbass.

CBS TV, September 13th, 2017

FULL TEXT:

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There’s a new plan to reduce the mute swan population on Long Island.

Some say the non-lethal plan is a kinder solution, while others continue to mount a strong public opposition.

The quacking of ducks and swans in the ponds of Massapequa Preserve helps draw thousands of people daily, yet the state Department of Environmental Conservation considers the growing population of mute swans to be a destructive, invasive species imported centuries ago from Europe.

For years, the agency has proposed killing them off, arguing they eat up all the vegetation needed by other native species.

Without exception, though, everyone CBS2 spoke with was horrified at doing anything to harm the mute swans.

“I think they’re beautiful,” Massapequa resident Jean Stigliano said. “I think we should leave them alone, if there is any kind of problem then we should relocate them.”

The intense public opposition now has the state agency reversing course, saying it will instead pursue “non-lethal means,” such as coating swan eggs with corn oil so they don’t hatch, or destroying their nests.

Some locals say that’s equally cruel.

“The poor swans are still there, sitting on their eggs every day and then one day they’re all dead! How horrible, how horrible, you can’t do that,” Massapequa resident Joan Locascio said.

The state environmental department says it must also protect public safety, warning the elegant birds can become aggressive toward anyone feeding them.

That’s exactly what happened to Sean Hogan’s younger daughter.

“My daughter was feeding the swan, it came up and she had a little too much bread and it took a bite and grabbed her by her finger,” Hogan tells CBS2.

He says his daughter was not seriously harmed, arguing the same thing could happen with a family pet, and adds his family will keep feeding the swans and will oppose any attempt to remove them no matter which means are pursued.

The public will get a chance to have their say about the mute swans. A hearing on the agency’s latest plan is set for next Tuesday night in Hauppauge.

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Snowpacalypse is a ‘new’ word, a made up word combining ‘snow’ with apocalypse, which shows you how much they (the ones that made it up) know since they spelled it wrong. It’s also a word i hate and never wanted to use. I find it distasteful to use a word that refers to God’s judgment for a weather event. It’s a blizzard, let’s stick with that.

While i’m on my soapbox, why are we naming storms? Hurricanes are named because there are several in a season, there are five lists of names to rotate between the years and the names are in alphabetical order. That’s how you know if it was a particularly bad year, if you can a hurricane Tanya, that was a bad year. This naming of blizzards is rather haphazard. Winter Storm Jonas? Why not just ‘the January blizzard of 2016’ if you are worried there might be more. ‘The blizzard of 2015-16 winter’ if this is the only one.

I knew it had snowed before i opened my eyes, the snow plows on 2nd Avenue woke me. When i look at my windows i can see snow on my windowsills. The snow plows came by again so it must still be snowing, i haven’t looked out my windows yet. Not even when i heard some guy screaming for help, once. I hope someone helped him, or it was a joke.

Normally when it snows like this i go to the park and take pictures. Maybe tomorrow, today i’m staying in.

On the subway

There is no place like New York and nothing like the NYC subway system. I have determined there are three types of people that talk to me on the subway.

There are the people who ask for money. From what they say, none of them do drugs, none of them drink, all have suffered some unimaginable tragedy and can’t get government assistance.

There are the people asking me for directions. “Do I look like Google maps?”

There are the people offering to help find your train, this is usually followed by a request for money, so they could fall into the first category. What is really annoying is some of them feel they need to lead you to the correct train and “STOP TOUCHING ME”. I should get a medal for not stabbing people.

Then there is your random crazy person, like the tall skinny black man that told me I was “a white whore and you’re going to die of AIDS and cancer.” And the woman who offered me oral sex. She was convinced I would love it and I was just, “Ew no, germs.” Like I said, I should get a medal.

New information about lakes with blue-green algae bloom notices has been posted today, July 3, on the DEC Blue-Green Algal Bloom Notices webpage.

This week, 6 waterbodies were added to the notification list, and blooms were reported in several locations in the state. This information is provided from about 130 waterbodies sampled in the last two to three weeks by DEC monitoring programs, volunteers and public reports.

Because waterbodies may have blue-green algae blooms that have not been reported to DEC, we recommend avoiding contact with floating rafts, scums and discolored water – If you see it, avoid it and report it!



Know the symptoms of blue-green algae exposure

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • skin or throat irritation
  • allergic reactions or breathing difficulties

These symptoms may be mistaken for common gastrointestinal distress, for example, food poisoning, heat exposure, or other illness. Regardless of the cause of the illness, these symptoms may require medical attention. If you have been exposed to blue green algae blooms and experience any of the symptoms, seek medical assistance. More information about these symptoms can be found on the Department of Health Blue-green Algae web page.

Report your symptoms



The New York State Department of Health is collecting information to evaluate the frequency and intensity of illness and other problems from blue green algae exposure. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should send an email summarizing these symptoms and the location of the bloom to harmfulalgae@health.ny.gov and your local health department.

Report a suspected bloom

If you suspect you have seen a blue-green algae bloom, or you, your family, or pet has been in contact with a blue-green algae bloom, please follow the instructions for reporting a bloom to DEC.

NYC Lens, April 29th, 2015

FULL TEXT:

Coyotes are popping up across the city–on a roof, behind a bush and sitting doe-eyed in a crate after being captured by the New York City Police Department. Their presence might seem unusual to city residents, but the coyotes are just a local chapter of a country-wide trend of urban coyotes.

In the past decade, as human development encroaches on the natural habitat of coyotes, many of the animals have moved into urban areas. Another factor: Their natural predator, the gray wolf, has become an endangered species in the last three years, allowing the coyote population to expand its borders. Scientists call this natural range expansion.

“We have to accept the fact that natural range expansion is part of the ecology of wildlife globally,” Camilla Fox, founder and executive director of Project Coyote, said. “Natural range expansion is exactly what’s happening, and some of this is in response to alteration of habitat.”

Project Coyote is a California-based organization that seeks to destigmatize coyotes. The group promotes peaceful coexistence with coyotes through conversations with wildlife scientists, ranchers, educators and community leaders. The organization provides several resources to help the public better understand and interact with coyotes.

In New York state alone, there are 14,500 breeding pairs of coyotes. According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, coyotes began moving into the state in the 1930s. Instead of living in packs, like some of their West coast relatives, eastern coyotes tend to live in pairs. All coyotes mate for life.

One common misconception Project Coyote hopes to dispel is that coyotes are dangerous.

“Your chances of being bitten or attacked by a coyote are incredibly low,” she said.

Though there is not a centralized way to keep track of coyote attacks, Fox said that anecdotally, there are relatively few coyote attacks on humans compared to dog bites, which average about 1,000 per day.

Urban coyotes have inspired creative initiatives like the Urban Coyote Project, a collaboration between three journalists–Jaymi Heimbuch, Morgan Heim and Karine Aigner–with an affinity for canines. Each based in a different city, the journalists learn the habits of local urban coyotes and photograph them, posting photo galleries along with information from wildlife scientists to help spread correct information about coyotes.

“When we understand more, we can coexist easier and fear less,” Heimbuch, founder of the project, said.

Heimbuch and her colleagues were inspired by how adaptive and cunning species is. She hopes to expand their project to include both a film and a book.

The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation recommends several tips for “coexisting with coyotes” based on Project Coyote’s guidelines. Residents are encouraged not to feed the animals so they do not become accustomed to humans, safely store food and garbage in animal-proof receptacles, keep dogs leashed while outside, keep cats indoors, and scare off coyotes if a coyote approaches you in a park or a neighborhood.

Project Coyote also recommends “hazing” the coyotes by making yourself appear large and loud by shouting, waving your arms and flashing lights until the coyote retreats. If residents come across a coyote who is not responding to this or if someone is bitten or hurt, call 9-1-1.

The final recommendation from the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is to appreciate the animals from a distance.

“They have shown to be incredibly resilient and able to coexist with us and tolerate human disturbance,” Fox said. “We haven’t shown that kind of tolerance for the species.”

There are more people bitten by dogs than coyotes. Don’t you think this might be because dogs live with people and coyotes don’t?

Wall Street Journal, April 23rd, 2015

FULL TEXT:

Wildlife experts said New Yorkers might as well get accustomed to seeing more coyotes after two of the animals were spotted recently in Manhattan.

A coyote gave New York City police officers the slip Wednesday in Riverside Park near the site of Grant’s Tomb. Last week, another coyote was captured in Chelsea.

As the animals continue breeding in the woodland areas of the Bronx, younger coyotes are forced to stake out their own territories to the south, wildlife experts said.

“I do believe it will become a more frequent part of our spring and late fall to see them in Manhattan,” said Mark Weckel, a conservation biologist at the American Museum of Natural History and co-founder of the Gotham Coyote Project, which studies coyotes in New York City.

In addition to the two recently spotted in Manhattan, coyotes have been seen in New Jersey’s Bergen County: One person was bitten in Norwood and another in Saddle River.

Coyotes are common in suburban areas like Norwood, and are found in every county in the state, said Lawrence Hajna, a spokesman for New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

“They are a very adaptable creature,” Mr. Hajna said.

The animals have been in the state since at least 1939, he said.

Coyotes were first spotted in New York state in the 1920s, Mr. Weckel said. In the 1940s, coyotes entered the state from its northern border, and during the 1960s, they started coming from the west, he said.

Coyotes made it to Westchester County by the 1970s, and Mr. Weckel said they were first verified in the Bronx during the 1990s.

Coyotes have been known to breed in parks in the Bronx, but there has been no confirmed breeding in other parts of the city or on Long Island, Mr. Weckel said.

Coyotes feed on rodents, deer, rabbits and fruit.

“When the young become mature, they are basically pushed out of their territory” by their parents, said Joe Pane, principal fish and wildlife biologist with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

As coyotes run out of available territories in the wooded areas of Westchester County and the Bronx, many travel along the Hudson River or even down the tracks of the Metro-North Railroad in search of their own territory in Manhattan.

“It’s been confirmed there are breeding pairs in a number of [Bronx] parks and that’s consistent with this theory that this population of coyotes really have been expanding in New York state and moving southward since like the 1930s,” said Sarah Aucoin, director of the Urban Park Rangers with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation.

“New York [City] is at the southern end of New York state, so it sort of makes sense they would be last to arrive here in the state,” she said.

Coyotes have grown adept at surviving in other big-city environments, such as Chicago.

In 2006, there were an estimated 2,000 coyotes living in Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, according to Stanley Gehrt, associate professor at the Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, who has been studying coyotes around the Chicago area for 15 years.

That number is higher now, he says.

“Once they got established in the nooks and crannies of the metro area, they responded quickly to available food and water and the relative safety in the city,” Mr. Gehrt said.

New York state and New York City don’t have population estimates for coyotes.

Is my Keurig killing me?

The only appliance in my kitchen is a Keurig. Recently I read an article about the hazards of using a Keurig. After describing how you can never empty the water completely and the sludge and microbes and mold that will grow in it, she went on to talk about the foil that seals the top of the plastic cup and the actual toxicity of the plastic, I was convinced that the mold would kill me, or the foil would give me Alzheimer’s or the plastic would poison me and make life not worth living. Then I read an article that disagreed with the first article, convincing me that my Keurig is not a death ray masquerading as a single cup coffee maker.

Fully realizing that anyone can claim to be an expert and write anything and pretend it is Gospel, after all that is what all those anti-vaccine idiots did to convince gullible parents to not vaccinate their children and endanger us all. By the way, is it possible for an adult to get a pertussis vaccine shot?

It just so happens that I use a filter for my Keurig, so I don’t have the plastic cup and foil lid problems but there is the still the reservoir with its supposed mold growth. Here is where I put my own brain to use. I am extremely allergic to mold. If I was drinking mold everyday, in the form of my morning cup of coffee, I would be sick. But I’m not. So I’m still using my Keurig, and loving it.

Cleaning with Bella

New York City is dirty. There is a fine black dust everywhere, I think it is the result of all those cars driving over all that asphalt. It comes in between the window and the frame and settles on the surfaces of my apartment. My windowsills are white and a week after I sweep up the dust they are black again.

The Tuesday night I cooked my lentils and the pot boiled over I didn’t want to clean it up. The stove was hot and the sink was full and so forth. Besides, I wasn’t working the next day so I would clean it then. I got up the next day and scrubbed off the dried up mess, then I wiped down the rest of the stovetop. As soon as the wet sponge came in contact with the fine black dust, it turned to black streaks on the stove. The black streaks annoyed me, I had to clean the whole stovetop now, which meant I had to take the burners off and wash them, but the sink was full of dishes.

Everything in my apartment is small, that means big jobs have to be done in stages. I washed as many dishes as would fit in my dish drain, then I had to stop and do something else until they dried. Then finish washing the rest, then I could take the burners off and put them in soapy water in the sink, then spray the stovetop and wipe it down. Then lift the top to see if anything had fallen through and needed to be cleaned up. So now the stove was nice was clean. The counters looked dingy next to it. I’m pretty sure you can guess what had to happen next. Moving everything aside, spraying and wiping and moving back until the whole kitchen was bright and shiny. It’s amazing how long it takes to get such a small area clean.

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Outside my apartment door.

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There is still snow in the playground, park.

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I keep forgetting the subway stairs are being repaired.

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My eczema is getting worse. Need to use my cream more.
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Finally headed home.

And there are 8 things you should know about Mesothelioma. They are listed on The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog.

My first job was at a place called “Tampa Rubber & Gasket”, some of the gaskets were cut from sheets of pressed asbestos. I should probably be more worried about this than I am, but I don’t think there is anything I could do about it at this point, other than just watch for symptoms and get regular screening. I keep telling Em, I’m not going to die of anything because nothing interesting happens to me. She always rolls her eyes at that.